thegrayprince
historical-nonfiction:

Meet Snorri Sturluson, a renowned 13th century Icelander.
he was born a commoner, but raised by a relative of the Norwegian family
Snorri received a good education and when the time was right married into a cheftainship and estate
by this time, he had gained some renown as a gifted poet
Snorri  was elected lawspeaker for the Althing, the only public office in Iceland — and a position with considerable respect
by royal invitation, Snorri traveled to Norway. King Haakon piled the man with gifts,  and Snorri thanked him by writing poems glorifying the young king’s reign
when he returned he was re-elected lawspeaker, mainly due to his fame as a poet
King Haakon wanted to join with Iceland, and as a chieftain Snorri initially favored the idea. But he changed his mind, famously telling Hakon “I will go home”
Snorri’s“Heimskringla” the best-known of the Old Norse sagas, tells the stories of Norwegian kings and in the 1900s became seen in Norway as establishing an ancient national identity

historical-nonfiction:

Meet Snorri Sturluson, a renowned 13th century Icelander.

  • he was born a commoner, but raised by a relative of the Norwegian family
  • Snorri received a good education and when the time was right married into a cheftainship and estate
  • by this time, he had gained some renown as a gifted poet
  • Snorri  was elected lawspeaker for the Althing, the only public office in Iceland — and a position with considerable respect
  • by royal invitation, Snorri traveled to Norway. King Haakon piled the man with gifts,  and Snorri thanked him by writing poems glorifying the young king’s reign
  • when he returned he was re-elected lawspeaker, mainly due to his fame as a poet
  • King Haakon wanted to join with Iceland, and as a chieftain Snorri initially favored the idea. But he changed his mind, famously telling Hakon “I will go home”
  • Snorri’s“Heimskringla” the best-known of the Old Norse sagas, tells the stories of Norwegian kings and in the 1900s became seen in Norway as establishing an ancient national identity
thegrayprince
johanoosterman:

Black manuscripts - actually on parchment that was painted black - are amongst the rarest manuscripts we have. At the end of the fifteenth century at the court of Burgundy they were popular for a while. Well known is the black hours in the Morgan Library, but barely known is the black manuscript in Brussels (KB 9085) with dance melodies. On a black ground the notes were drawn in silver while the text was written in gold. Underneath the golden text, silvery letters indicate the dance steps.

johanoosterman:

Black manuscripts - actually on parchment that was painted black - are amongst the rarest manuscripts we have. At the end of the fifteenth century at the court of Burgundy they were popular for a while. Well known is the black hours in the Morgan Library, but barely known is the black manuscript in Brussels (KB 9085) with dance melodies. On a black ground the notes were drawn in silver while the text was written in gold. Underneath the golden text, silvery letters indicate the dance steps.