only-ten-percent-clever
pvwitch:

im-not-mine:

Johann Wilhelm Cordes, The Wild Hunt, 1856/57.
The Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe. The fundamental premise in all instances is the same: a phantasmal, spectral group of huntsmen with the accoutrements of hunting, with horses and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or just above it.
The hunters may be the dead or fairies (often in folklore connected with the dead). The hunter may be an unidentified lost soul, a deity or spirit of either gender, or may be a historical or legendary figure like Theodoric the Great, the Danish king Valdemar Atterdag, the Welsh psychopomp Gwyn ap Nudd or the Germanic Woden (or other reflections of the same god, such as Alemannic Wuodan in Wuotis Heer (“Wuodan’s Army”) of Central Switzerland, Swabia etc.).
Seeing the Wild Hunt was thought to presage some catastrophe such as war or plague, or at best the death of the one who witnessed it. Mortals getting in the path of or following the Hunt could be kidnapped and brought to the land of the dead. A girl who saw Wild Edric’s Ride was warned by her father to put her apron over her head to avoid the sight. Others believed that people’s spirits could be pulled away during their sleep to join the cavalcade.
In Germany, where it was also known as the “Wild Army”, or “Furious Army”, its leader was given various identities, including Wodan (or “Woden”), Knecht Ruprecht (Krampus), Berchtold (or Berchta), and Holda (or “Holle”). The Wild Hunt is also known from post-medieval folklore.

As the air grows unseasonably colder at an alarming speed, I wait for the winds to blow over the fields. I await the Wild Hunt with a bottle of spirits, in the hopes that they will leave my family in peace this winter.

pvwitch:

im-not-mine:

Johann Wilhelm Cordes, The Wild Hunt, 1856/57.

The Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe. The fundamental premise in all instances is the same: a phantasmal, spectral group of huntsmen with the accoutrements of hunting, with horses and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or just above it.

The hunters may be the dead or fairies (often in folklore connected with the dead). The hunter may be an unidentified lost soul, a deity or spirit of either gender, or may be a historical or legendary figure like Theodoric the Great, the Danish king Valdemar Atterdag, the Welsh psychopomp Gwyn ap Nudd or the Germanic Woden (or other reflections of the same god, such as Alemannic Wuodan in Wuotis Heer (“Wuodan’s Army”) of Central Switzerland, Swabia etc.).

Seeing the Wild Hunt was thought to presage some catastrophe such as war or plague, or at best the death of the one who witnessed it. Mortals getting in the path of or following the Hunt could be kidnapped and brought to the land of the dead. A girl who saw Wild Edric’s Ride was warned by her father to put her apron over her head to avoid the sight. Others believed that people’s spirits could be pulled away during their sleep to join the cavalcade.

In Germany, where it was also known as the “Wild Army”, or “Furious Army”, its leader was given various identities, including Wodan (or “Woden”), Knecht Ruprecht (Krampus), Berchtold (or Berchta), and Holda (or “Holle”). The Wild Hunt is also known from post-medieval folklore.

As the air grows unseasonably colder at an alarming speed, I wait for the winds to blow over the fields. I await the Wild Hunt with a bottle of spirits, in the hopes that they will leave my family in peace this winter.

tudorhistory

the-wicked-knight:

1)Field and tournament armour of King Henry VIII. English, Greenwich, dated 1540. Possible intended for wear at the tournament held during 15 May 1540 to celebrate May Day. Made by Erasmus Kyrkenar and decorated by Giovanni di Maiano or Francis Quelblaunce based on designs by Hans Holbein the Younger.

2)Horse armour of King Henry VIII (known as the Burgundian Bard). Flemish, about 1511-15. Part of an armour presented by the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, to Henry VIII to mark his marriage to Katherine of Aragon. Made by Guille Margot and decorated by Paul van Vrelant.

3)Combat armor for Henry VIII(when he was in his early twenties), which was meant to be used at the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520. It is the only surviving example of an all-enclosing armor; the entire body is covered.

4)Henry VIII’s armor from about 1540.

5)a young Henry VIII’s jousting armor with intertwined Hs and Ks,dated 1515, now in the Tower of London.

6)Field Armor of King Henry VIII of England Steel, blackened, etched, and gilt; textile and leather Italian (Milan or Brescia), about 1544.

7)The Field Armor of King Henry VIII of England “This impressive armor was made for Henry VIII (r. 1509–47) towards the end of his life when he was overweight and crippled with gout. Constructed for use on horse and on foot it was probably worn by the king during his last military campaign, the siege of Boulogne in 1544.”

notjustanarmor

the-wicked-knight:

1)”Waistcoat” Cuirass (Combined Breast- Backplates), c.1580 N. Italy, 16th Cen. English Gentleman used this type of armour aboard ship to brigandine.

2)Brigandine in the Musée d’Artillerie, Paris.

3)Armor Italian about 1400 CE featuring an early form of brigandine - a torso defense constructed of numerous overlapping plates riveted inside a doublet Steel brass and textile, by mharrsch, via Flickr.

4)Leather Armor, Brigandine, Jack of Plate, English, c1590.

castlefanaticus

the-wicked-knight:

1)Egeskov Castle (Danish: Egeskov Slot) is located in the south of the island of Funen, Denmark.

2)Kronborg Slot (Denmark), fabulous 16th-century castle in Helsingør, made famous as the Elsinore Castle of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. It’s the venue for summer performances of Shakespeare’s play during the Hamlet festival.’ www.lonelyplanet….

3)Castle Klink, Denmark.

4)Rosenborg Castle Copenhagen, Denmark.

5)Frederiksborg Castle Gardens, Denmark.

6)Frederiksborg Castle, Denmark.

reneausten
the-wicked-knight:


Portions of a Ceremonial Armor ca. 1575–80 French

This armor was severely damaged by fire in the 1870s, destroying its gorget (collar) and arm defenses and melting off the gilding that originally covered all its exterior surfaces. Despite this damage, the remaining parts are important as examples of French ceremonial armor from the period of Henri III (reigned 1574–89). The embossed decoration consists of battle scenes of soldiers wearing Classical armor.

the-wicked-knight:

Portions of a Ceremonial Armor ca. 1575–80 French

This armor was severely damaged by fire in the 1870s, destroying its gorget (collar) and arm defenses and melting off the gilding that originally covered all its exterior surfaces. Despite this damage, the remaining parts are important as examples of French ceremonial armor from the period of Henri III (reigned 1574–89). The embossed decoration consists of battle scenes of soldiers wearing Classical armor.